Friday Smorgasbord: Neoliberalism, Charters, & Glasses


A friendly reminder: Schools are complex

“More interventions might not always be better and may have unintended consequences that impact a school’s long term ability to improve,” write Dougherty and Weiner.

New study deepens nation’s school turnaround mystery, finding little success in Rhode Island, Chalkbeat

The pervasive problem of neoliberalism

Society reconceived as a giant market leads to a public life lost to bickering over mere opinions; until the public turns, finally, in frustration to a strongman as a last resort for solving its otherwise intractable problems.

…When we abandoned, for its embarrassing residue of subjectivity, reason as a form of truth, and made science the sole arbiter of both the real and the true, we created a void that pseudo-science was happy to fill.

Implications for education here.

Neoliberalism: the idea that swallowed the world, The Guardian

Irony in the daggers thrown at NY state proposal for new charter teacher training

Calling the proposal “insulting,” Rosa said, “don’t compromise my profession.”

This is from the same Board of Regents that has removed basic literacy requirements for new teachers.

There’s a teacher shortage in high needs subjects and of teachers of color. Seems to me if charters can demonstrate they can train new teachers adequately without certification, then this could be a viable pathway into the profession that we should be welcoming, rather than fighting against. In the meantime, we can work on actually elevating the certified pathway by beefing up our higher ed programs and more closely examining how well they really are preparing teachers in the field.

Yes, I think charters overwork their teachers and demand a lot of them, often for less pay. I wouldn’t want to teach at Success Academy. But that would be the price to pay for not gaining certification via a more traditional route.

I’m all about honoring the profession. But I also know, like many other educators, that the real learning only began once I got into the classroom. It’s about whether or not you’ve been supported at that point thereon that really matters.

If charters can demonstrate effectiveness with these uncertified teachers, then what’s the problem? Isn’t this about the kids?

Charter Schools Could Get to Hire Teachers With Only 30 Hours of Training, DNAInfo

The importance of glasses in the classroom

Each year in my classroom, I had kids who desperately needed glasses and didn’t have them. My school worked with parents and external partners to obtain them, but it was a process. And there were some of my students who I had to “remind” to wear their glasses in my glass every single day, because they didn’t want to wear them.

But something this elemental can have a huge impact. So I’m heartened to see this effort in Baltimore to bring free eyeglasses to students to demonstrate this impact.

“The outcomes were notable enough even with the small sample size—reading proficiency improved significantly compared with the children who did not need eyeglasses—that the researchers decided to radically expand the study to the whole city to see if the results held.”

How Free Eyeglasses Are Boosting Test Scores in Baltimore, Politico magazine

Poor children who grow up in rural counties are more likely to marry

Writers such as author and CNN commentator J.D. Vance, author of Hillbilly Elegy, look at rural areas and see dysfunction and decline. Citing Chetty, Vance wrote that in Appalachia “poor kids really struggled.”

What Chetty and Hendren find, however, is that much of rural America isn’t a source of individual pathology but a place where we can all witness the beneficial impacts of community.

Rural Upbringing Increases Odds That Young People Will Marry, The Daily Yonder

School closing and consolidations can be bad for rural communities

Schools matter to the social fabric and cultural vitality of a rural community; they are places where relationships are sustained, where traditions are preserved and values are learned.

Close A Rural School, Hurt A Rural Community, The Daily Yonder

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